Modularity maximization and tree clustering: Novel ways to determine effective geographic borders

@article{Grady2011ModularityMA,
  title={Modularity maximization and tree clustering: Novel ways to determine effective geographic borders},
  author={Daniel Grady and Rafael Brune and Christian Thiemann and Fabian J. Theis and Dirk Brockmann},
  journal={ArXiv},
  year={2011},
  volume={abs/1104.1200}
}
Territorial subdivisions and geographic borders are essential for understanding phenomena in sociology, political science, history, and economics. They influence the interregional flow of information and cross-border trade and affect the diffusion of innovation and technology. However, most existing administrative borders were determined by a variety of historic and political circumstances along with some degree of arbitrariness. Societies have changed drastically, and it is doubtful that… 
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