Modifying the ‘pulse–reserve’ paradigm for deserts of North America: precipitation pulses, soil water, and plant responses

Abstract

The ‘pulse–reserve’ conceptual model—arguably one of the most-cited paradigms in aridland ecology—depicts a simple, direct relationship between rainfall, which triggers pulses of plant growth, and reserves of carbon and energy. While the heuristics of ‘pulses’, ‘triggers’ and ‘reserves’ are intuitive and thus appealing, the value of the paradigm is limited… (More)
DOI: 10.1007/s00442-004-1524-4

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Cite this paper

@article{Reynolds2004ModifyingT, title={Modifying the ‘pulse–reserve’ paradigm for deserts of North America: precipitation pulses, soil water, and plant responses}, author={James F. Reynolds and Paul R Kemp and Kiona Ogle and Roberto Fern{\'a}ndez}, journal={Oecologia}, year={2004}, volume={141}, pages={194-210} }