Modifying protein misfolding

@article{Jones2010ModifyingPM,
  title={Modifying protein misfolding},
  author={Daniel Jones},
  journal={Nature Reviews Drug Discovery},
  year={2010},
  volume={9},
  pages={825-827}
}
  • Daniel Jones
  • Published 29 October 2010
  • Biology
  • Nature Reviews Drug Discovery
Two recent deals highlight growing interest in therapeutically targeting protein misfolding to treat both rare and common diseases. 
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