Modifying U.S. Acceptance of the Compulsory Jurisdiction of the World Court

@article{DAmato1985ModifyingUA,
  title={Modifying U.S. Acceptance of the Compulsory Jurisdiction of the World Court},
  author={Anthony M. D'Amato},
  journal={American Journal of International Law},
  year={1985},
  volume={79},
  pages={385 - 405}
}
  • A. D'Amato
  • Published 1 April 1985
  • Law
  • American Journal of International Law
There is little doubt, in the wake of the decision of the International Court of Justice on jurisdiction in Nicaragua v. United States, that the U.S. Government will modify its 1946 Declaration accepting the compulsory jurisdiction of the Court under the "optional clause." There will probably be rash calls for the United States to withdraw completely from the optional clause. This paper proposes, first, several modifications of the U.S. Declaration that arguably serve the national as well as… 

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