Modernity, Mestizaje, and Hispano Art: Patrocinio Barela and the Federal Art Project

@article{Lewthwaite2010ModernityMA,
  title={Modernity, Mestizaje, and Hispano Art: Patrocinio Barela and the Federal Art Project},
  author={S. Lewthwaite},
  journal={Journal of the Southwest},
  year={2010},
  volume={52},
  pages={41 - 70}
}
yet symbolic. At a time when European modernists integrated primitive art from Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas into their own oeuvre—viewing sculpture as the most primitive of art forms—critics quickly discerned an affinity between the formal qualities of Barela’s art and an evolving Western modernist aesthetic.29 FAP itself became imbued with this impulse through National Director Holger Cahill, who organized MoMA’s American Primitives (1930) and American Sources of Modern Art (1933… Expand

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