Modernities Compared: State Transformations and Constitutions of Property in the Qing and Ottoman Empires

@article{Islamoglu2001ModernitiesCS,
  title={Modernities Compared: State Transformations and Constitutions of Property in the Qing and Ottoman Empires},
  author={H. Islamoglu},
  journal={Journal of Early Modern History},
  year={2001},
  volume={5},
  pages={353-386}
}
  • H. Islamoglu
  • Published 2001
  • Political Science
  • Journal of Early Modern History
Modernity has long been the preserve of Europe. Social science perspectives on modernization that have shaped the categories of historical analysis since the nineteenth century have excluded the Ottoman and the Chinese empires from mappings of modernity.' Instead, the two empires are designated as part of an undifferentiated and ahistorical domain of the East, characterized by what it lacks: individual ownership of property, rational organization of market activity, and rational bureaucratic… Expand
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