Modernist Feminist Witchcraft: Margaret Murray’s Fantastic Scholarship and Sylvia Townsend Warner’s Realist Fantasy

@article{Winick2015ModernistFW,
  title={Modernist Feminist Witchcraft: Margaret Murray’s Fantastic Scholarship and Sylvia Townsend Warner’s Realist Fantasy},
  author={Mimi Winick},
  journal={Modernism/modernity},
  year={2015},
  volume={22},
  pages={565 - 592}
}
ion. And when she does this, she finds she remembers something important, and her thoughts themselves “slid together . . . like a pack of hounds” to join the hunt for the “clue to the secret country of her mind.” Lolly’s self-discovery occurs through abstraction; and, moreover, she discovers she is both hunter and prey—that she embod-ion; and, moreover, she discovers she is both hunter and prey—that she embodWinick / modernist feminist witchcraft 581 ies a witchy state of powerful passivity… Expand
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In 1999, The New York Review of Books reprinted Sylvia Townsend Warner’s first novel, Lolly Willowes, as part of its eclectic “Classics” series. Reading this now widely accessible work—firstExpand
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No British folklorist can remember Dr Margaret Murray without embarrassment and a sense of paradox. She is one of the few folklorists whose name became widely known to the public, but among scholarsExpand
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Winner of the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize. "One of the most shamefully under-read great British authors of the past 100 years." (Sarah Waters). The poet Sylvia Townsend Warner rose to sudden fame withExpand
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Since the late nineteenth century, Western intellectuals have tended to depict ‘modernity’ as being incompatible with ‘enchantment’. Thus Max Weber argued that two aspects intrinsic to modernity,Expand
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As a historian of religions, I cannot fail to be impressed by the amazing popularity of witchcraft in modern Western culture and subculture. However, in the present essay I will not discuss thisExpand
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IN THIS ARTICLE, I DISCUSS THE LITERARY USES OF WITCHES AND WITCHCRAFT IN British fiction of the mid-1920s, in the social context of the contemporaneous interest in the occult. Almost nothing hasExpand
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