Modern optics in exceptionally preserved eyes of Early Cambrian arthropods from Australia

@article{Lee2011ModernOI,
  title={Modern optics in exceptionally preserved eyes of Early Cambrian arthropods from Australia},
  author={Michael S. Y. Lee and J. B. Jago and Diego C. Garc{\'i}a-Bellido and Gregory D. Edgecombe and James G. Gehling and John R. Paterson},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={474},
  pages={631-634}
}
Despite the status of the eye as an “organ of extreme perfection”, theory suggests that complex eyes can evolve very rapidly. The fossil record has, until now, been inadequate in providing insight into the early evolution of eyes during the initial radiation of many animal groups known as the Cambrian explosion. This is surprising because Cambrian Burgess-Shale-type deposits are replete with exquisitely preserved animals, especially arthropods, that possess eyes. However, with the exception of… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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