Modern Views of Electricity

@article{LodgeModernVO,
  title={Modern Views of Electricity},
  author={Oliver Joseph Lodge},
  journal={Nature},
  volume={36},
  pages={582-585}
}
  • O. Lodge
  • Published 1 October 1887
  • Physics
  • Nature
PART II. III. WE have now glanced through electro-static phenomena, and seen that they could be all comprehended and partially explained by supposing electricity to be a fluid of perfect incompressibility—in other words, a liquid—permeating everywhere and everything; and by further supposing that in conducting matter this liquid was capable of free locomotion, but that in insulators and general space it was as it were entangled in some elastic medium or jelly, to strains in which electrostatic… 

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