Moderation of the Effect of Adolescent-Onset Cannabis Use on Adult Psychosis by a Functional Polymorphism in the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Gene: Longitudinal Evidence of a Gene X Environment Interaction

@article{Caspi2005ModerationOT,
  title={Moderation of the Effect of Adolescent-Onset Cannabis Use on Adult Psychosis by a Functional Polymorphism in the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Gene: Longitudinal Evidence of a Gene X Environment Interaction},
  author={A. Caspi and T. Moffitt and M. Cannon and J. McClay and R. Murray and H. Harrington and Alan H. Taylor and L. Arseneault and B. Williams and A. Braithwaite and R. Poulton and I. Craig},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2005},
  volume={57},
  pages={1117-1127}
}
BACKGROUND Recent evidence documents that cannabis use by young people is a modest statistical risk factor for psychotic symptoms in adulthood, such as hallucinations and delusions, as well as clinically significant schizophrenia. The vast majority of cannabis users do not develop psychosis, however, prompting us to hypothesize that some people are genetically vulnerable to the deleterious effects of cannabis. METHODS In a longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort followed to… Expand
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The results suggest that the COMT Val(158)Met polymorphism moderates the effect of regular cannabis use on severity of subclinical psychotic symptoms. Expand
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  • Medicine
  • World psychiatry : official journal of the World Psychiatric Association
  • 2008
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Abstract Systematic reviews of prospective studies have consistently evidenced the role of cannabis use as a risk factor for the emergence of psychosis. However, as expected in multifactorial complexExpand
Cannabis use and psychosis onset: from epidemiology to clinical practice
Results Cannabis use is associated with a 2to 3fold increase in the relative risk for psychosis in individuals with familial and genetic vulnerability. The results of several prospective studies alsoExpand
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  • Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie
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It is most plausible that cannabis use precipitates schizophrenia in individuals who are vulnerable because of a personal or family history of schizophrenia. Expand
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