Models and Statistical Inference: The Controversy between Fisher and Neyman–Pearson

@article{Lenhard2006ModelsAS,
  title={Models and Statistical Inference: The Controversy between Fisher and Neyman–Pearson},
  author={Johannes Lenhard},
  journal={The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={57},
  pages={69 - 91}
}
  • J. Lenhard
  • Published 1 March 2006
  • Mathematics
  • The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science
The main thesis of the paper is that in the case of modern statistics, the differences between the various concepts of models were the key to its formative controversies. The mathematical theory of statistical inference was mainly developed by Ronald A. Fisher, Jerzy Neyman, and Egon S. Pearson. Fisher on the one side and Neyman–Pearson on the other were involved often in a polemic controversy. The common view is that Neyman and Pearson made Fisher's account more stringent mathematically. It is… 
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