Corpus ID: 23249383

Modeling the Mental Lexicon as a Complex System: Some Preliminary Results Using Graph Theoretic Measures 1

@inproceedings{Gruenenfelder2005ModelingTM,
  title={Modeling the Mental Lexicon as a Complex System: Some Preliminary Results Using Graph Theoretic Measures 1},
  author={T. Gruenenfelder and D. Pisoni},
  year={2005}
}
The mental lexicon used for spoken word recognition was modeled as a complex system using tools of graph theory. Words were represented as nodes in the model, and an edge was placed between two nodes if the corresponding words could be changed into one another via a single phoneme deletion, addition, or substitution. The resulting graph had a small-world, scale-free structure. However, the scale-free property reflected the fact that words have different lengths and are created from a relatively… Expand
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