Modeling the Climatic Response to Orbital Variations

@article{Imbrie1980ModelingTC,
  title={Modeling the Climatic Response to Orbital Variations},
  author={John Z. Imbrie and John Z. Imbrie},
  journal={Science},
  year={1980},
  volume={207},
  pages={943 - 953}
}
According to the astronomical theory of climate, variations in the earth's orbit are the fundamental cause of the succession of Pleistocene ice ages. This article summarizes how the theory has evolved since the pioneer studies of James Croll and Milutin Milankovitch, reviews recent evidence that supports the theory, and argues that a major opportunity is at hand to investigate the physical mechanisms by which the climate system responds to orbital forcing. After a survey of the kinds of models… 

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