Modeling of High and Low Resistant States in Single Defect Atomristors

@article{Misra2022ModelingOH,
  title={Modeling of High and Low Resistant States in Single Defect Atomristors},
  author={Y. Misra and Tarun Kumar Agarwal},
  journal={ArXiv},
  year={2022},
  volume={abs/2206.05504}
}
Resistance-change random access memory (RRAM) devices are nanoscale metal-insulator-metal structures that can store information in their resistance states, namely the high resistance (HRS) and low resistance (LRS) states. They are a potential candidate for a universal memory as these non-volatile memory elements can offer fast-switching, long retention and switching cycles, and additionally, are also suitable for direct applications in neuromorphic computing. In this study, we first present a… 

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