Modeling Temperature-Dependent Range Limits for the Fire Ant Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in the United States

@inproceedings{Korzukhin2001ModelingTR,
  title={Modeling Temperature-Dependent Range Limits for the Fire Ant Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in the United States},
  author={Michael D. Korzukhin and Sanford D. Porter and Lynne C. Thompson and Suzanne Wiley},
  year={2001}
}
Abstract We predict the future range of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta Buren within the United States based on climate and its current extreme distributions. To reach that goal, a dynamic model of colony growth with two time steps per day was formulated that operates by colony area, S, and alate production, a. Colony growth rate depended on daily maximum and minimum soil temperatures. Temperature records at 4,537 meteorological stations within the current (near 1.5 million km2) and potential… Expand
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