Modeling Meanness: Associations Between Reality TV Consumption, Perceived Realism, and Adolescents' Social Aggression

@article{Ward2013ModelingMA,
  title={Modeling Meanness: Associations Between Reality TV Consumption, Perceived Realism, and Adolescents' Social Aggression},
  author={L. Monique Ward and Corissa Carlson},
  journal={Media Psychology},
  year={2013},
  volume={16},
  pages={371 - 389}
}
Although research documents connections between adolescents' television exposure and both their physical and social aggression, less is known about contributions of reality television. Might this genre be even more influential than other media formats because it features real-life people and may be perceived as more realistic? To examine this question, we surveyed 174 adolescents who indicated their regular exposure to five media formats or genres, their consumption of 23 socially aggressive… 

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