Modeling Hawaiian Ecosystem Degradation due to Invasive Plants under Current and Future Climates

@article{Vorsino2014ModelingHE,
  title={Modeling Hawaiian Ecosystem Degradation due to Invasive Plants under Current and Future Climates},
  author={Adam E. Vorsino and Lucas B Fortini and Fred A. Amidon and Stephen E. Miller and J. Jacobi and Jonathan P. Price and S. Gon and Gregory A. Koob},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2014},
  volume={9}
}
Occupation of native ecosystems by invasive plant species alters their structure and/or function. In Hawaii, a subset of introduced plants is regarded as extremely harmful due to competitive ability, ecosystem modification, and biogeochemical habitat degradation. By controlling this subset of highly invasive ecosystem modifiers, conservation managers could significantly reduce native ecosystem degradation. To assess the invasibility of vulnerable native ecosystems, we selected a proxy subset of… Expand
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