Model organisms: The ascent of mouse: advances in modelling human depression and anxiety

@article{Cryan2005ModelOT,
  title={Model organisms: The ascent of mouse: advances in modelling human depression and anxiety},
  author={John F. Cryan and Andrew B. Holmes},
  journal={Nature Reviews Drug Discovery},
  year={2005},
  volume={4},
  pages={775-790}
}
  • J. Cryan, A. Holmes
  • Published 1 September 2005
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Nature Reviews Drug Discovery
Psychiatry has proven to be among the least penetrable clinical disciplines for the development of satisfactory in vivo model systems for evaluating novel treatment approaches. However, mood and anxiety disorders remain poorly understood and inadequately treated. With the explosion in the use of genetically modified mice, enormous research efforts have been focused on developing mouse models of psychiatric disorders. The success of this approach is largely contingent on the usefulness of… 
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