Model experiments of otoconia stability after canalith repositioning procedure of BPPV

@article{Otsuka2010ModelEO,
  title={Model experiments of otoconia stability after canalith repositioning procedure of BPPV},
  author={Koji Otsuka and Mamoru Suzuki and Shigetaka Shimizu and Ujimoto Konomi and Taro Inagaki and Yoichi Iimura and Mami Hayashi and Yasuo Ogawa},
  journal={Acta Oto-Laryngologica},
  year={2010},
  volume={130},
  pages={804 - 809}
}
Abstract Conclusion: Postural restrictions are probably not necessary after the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP). Objectives: Epley reported the effect of CRP for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). After CRP, patients are often requested to restrict postural change. However, some studies suggested that CRP may work without postural restrictions. The present study aimed to determine the necessity of post-maneuver postural restriction using the frog labyrinth model. Methods: The… 
Development of a murine model of traumatic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a preliminary study
TLDR
A gradual detachment of otoconia in the utricle after a single event of head vibration is shown, possibly explaining the frequent recurrence of BPPV attacks and persistent dizziness after trauma.
Effect of Repositioning Maneuver Type and Postmaneuver Restrictions on Vertigo and Dizziness in Benign Positional Paroxysmal Vertigo
TLDR
Even if ST showed a higher rate of liberatory signs than Ep in this series, VAS scores were not influenced by these signs, and after repositioning maneuvers,VAS scores decreased similarly in patients with and without liberatorySigns.
Impact of Postmaneuver Sleep Position on Recurrence of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
TLDR
The habitual sleep side was associated with the side affected by BPPV, and patients sleeping on their affected side had a higher recurrence rate than those sleeping in other positions in first week after the repositioning maneuver.
The potential role of epigenetic modulations in BPPV maneuver exercises
TLDR
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo treatment might involve some epigenetic regulations through the mediation of miR-34a, SIRT1 functions and repression of redox status.
Detection of human utricular otoconia degeneration in vital specimen and implications for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo
TLDR
Morphological changes provide further evidence for degeneration of utricular otoconia in humans, which might be a preconditioning factor causing BPPV.

References

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TLDR
The results of the Canalith Repositioning Procedure support an alternative theory that the densities that impart gravity-sensitivity to a semicircular canal in BPPV are free in the canal, rather than attached to the cupula.
The effect of postural restrictions in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo
TLDR
Postural restriction therapy, practiced after the modified Epley repositioning maneuver, did not have a significant effect on the final outcomes of BPPV and is not recommend since there was no significant benefit for the patients who utilized postural restrictions.
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TLDR
The otoconia played an essential role as a transducer of acceleration to the utricular macula and hence are the possible cause of dizziness after physical therapy.
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TLDR
A vibratory stimulus was able to detach the otoconia from the utricle, suggesting that mechanical insult could be a possible etiology of BPPV.
No More Postural Restrictions in Posterior Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
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TLDR
Efficacy of Epley maneuver is not improved by postural restrictions, and it is recommended that patients with posterior canal BPPV do not receive any postural restriction after treatment.
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TLDR
It is shown that both maneuvers in BPPV were equally successful in controlling the symptoms and that post-treatment instructions were not necessary.
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TLDR
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TLDR
Thirty-six subjects with confirmed, unilateral benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo of at least 2 months' duration were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups and found that those who received the canalith repositioning procedure had significantly more negative responses than did those in the placebo group.
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TLDR
Bull frogs posterior semicircular canals wee used to simulate the condition of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and both cupulolithiasis and moving otoconia are possibly valid mechanisms of BPPV, since they effectively stimulate the cupula.
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TLDR
These single-treatment approaches are equally effective treatments for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and further studies are needed to look at the long-term effectiveness of these treatments.
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