Model Uncertainty and the Effect of Shall-Issue Right-to-Carry Laws on Crime

@article{Durlauf2015ModelUA,
  title={Model Uncertainty and the Effect of Shall-Issue Right-to-Carry Laws on Crime},
  author={S. Durlauf and S. Navarro and D. Rivers},
  journal={NBER Working Paper Series},
  year={2015}
}
In this paper, we explore the role of model uncertainty in explaining the different findings in the literature regarding the effect of shall-issue right-to-carry concealed weapons laws on crime. In particular, we systematically examine how different modeling assumptions affect the results. We find little support for some widely used assumptions in the literature (e.g., population weights), but find that allowing for the effect of the law to be heterogeneous across both counties and over time is… Expand
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