Model, Model on the Screen, What's the Cost of Going Green?

@inproceedings{Dowlatabadi2004ModelMO,
  title={Model, Model on the Screen, What's the Cost of Going Green?},
  author={Hadi Dowlatabadi and Donald Ray Boyd and Jamie MacDonald},
  year={2004}
}
How much a policy is expected to cost and who bears the brunt of that cost play a significant role in the debates that shape regulations. We do not have a good track record of predicting costs and their ultimate distribution, but systematic reviews of past assessments have identified some of the factors that lead to errors. A wide range of expected costs of climate policy have been hotly debated, but all are likely to be wrong. This does not mean that we should continue a debate using ill… CONTINUE READING

Figures from this paper.

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 28 REFERENCES

Residential energy consumption survey, Energy Information Agency, Department of Energy

EIA
  • 2001.
  • 2001
VIEW 3 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Sectoral costs and ancillary benefits of mitigation

T. Barker, L. Srivastava
  • Climate Change 2001: Mitigation - Contribution of Working Group III to the Third Assessment Report of the IPCC. O. Davidson, B. Metz, J. Pan and R. Swart. New York, Cambridge University Press: 561-99.
  • 2001
VIEW 2 EXCERPTS

A review of the treatment of technical change in energy economics models

C. Azar, H. Dowlatabadi
  • Annual Review of Energy and the Environment. R. Socolow. Palo Alto, California, Annual Reviews Inc. 24: 513-543.
  • 1999
VIEW 1 EXCERPT

International competitiveness and carbon taxation

T. Barker, N. Johnstone
  • International competitiveness and environmental policies. T. Barker and J. Köhler. Cheltenham, Edward Elgar: 71-127.
  • 1998
VIEW 2 EXCERPTS