Mode 3 Technologies and the Evolution of Modern Humans

@article{Foley1997Mode3T,
  title={Mode 3 Technologies and the Evolution of Modern Humans},
  author={Robert A. Foley and Marta Miraz{\'o}n Lahr},
  journal={Cambridge Archaeological Journal},
  year={1997},
  volume={7},
  pages={3 - 36}
}
  • R. Foley, M. Lahr
  • Published 1 April 1997
  • Environmental Science
  • Cambridge Archaeological Journal
The origins and evolution of modern humans has been the dominant interest in palaeoanthropology for the last decade, and much archaeological interpretation has been structured around the various issues associated with whether humans have a recent African origin or a more ancient one. While the archaeological record has been used to support or refute various aspects of the theories, and to provide a behavioural framework for different biological models, there has been little attempt to employ… 

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