Mobile phone use while cycling: Incidence and effects on behaviour and safety

@article{Waard2010MobilePU,
  title={Mobile phone use while cycling: Incidence and effects on behaviour and safety},
  author={D. de Waard and P. Schepers and W. Ormel and K. Brookhuis},
  journal={Ergonomics},
  year={2010},
  volume={53},
  pages={30 - 42}
}
The effects of mobile phone use on cycling behaviour were studied. In study 1, the prevalence of mobile phone use while cycling was assessed. In Groningen 2.2% of cyclists were observed talking on their phone and 0.6% were text messaging or entering a phone number. In study 2, accident-involved cyclists responded to a questionnaire. Only 0.5% stated that they were using their phone at the time of the accident. In study 3, participants used a phone while cycling. The content of the conversation… Expand
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