Moas as rockhounds

@article{Smalley1979MoasAR,
  title={Moas as rockhounds},
  author={Ian Smalley},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1979},
  volume={281},
  pages={103-104}
}
  • I. Smalley
  • Published 1 September 1979
  • Chemistry
  • Nature
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