Mixture of new sulfated steroids functions as a migratory pheromone in the sea lamprey

@article{Sorensen2005MixtureON,
  title={Mixture of new sulfated steroids functions as a migratory pheromone in the sea lamprey},
  author={Peter W. Sorensen and Jared M. Fine and Vadims Dvornikovs and Christopher S. Jeffrey and Feng Shao and Jizhou Wang and Lance A. Vrieze and Kari R Anderson and Thomas R. Hoye},
  journal={Nature Chemical Biology},
  year={2005},
  volume={1},
  pages={324-328}
}
The sea lamprey is an ancient, parasitic fish that invaded the Great Lakes a century ago, where it triggered the collapse of many fisheries1. Like many fishes, this species relies on chemical cues to mediate key aspects of its life, including migration and reproduction2,3. Here we report the discovery of a multicomponent steroidal pheromone that is released by stream-dwelling larval lamprey and guides adults to spawning streams. We isolated three compounds with pheromonal activity (in… Expand
Sulfated Bile Acids as Putative Sex Pheromone Components in Pacific Lamprey
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Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis on extracts of water conditioned with mature male Pacific Lampreys identified both 3kPZS and PZS, known as a component of migratory pheromones in Sea Lamprey Petromyzon marinus. Expand
Production and fate of the sea lamprey migratory pheromone
TLDR
It appears highly likely that a mixture of PADS, PSDS and PS is present at biologically relevant concentrations and ratios in many Great Lakes streams where it functions as a pheromonal attractant. Expand
Three Novel Bile Alcohols of Mature Male Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) Act as Chemical Cues for Conspecifics
TLDR
Three novel bile alcohols that are highly oxidized and sulfated, isolated from water conditioned with spermiated male sea lamprey are described and it is suggested that 1 and 2 may be putative pheromones that mediate chemical communication in sea lampreys. Expand
Mixtures of Two Bile Alcohol Sulfates Function as a Proximity Pheromone in Sea Lamprey
TLDR
Chemical evidence is shown that unequivocally confirms the elucidated structure of DkPES, electrophysiological evidence that each component is independently detected by the olfactory epithelium, and behavioral evidence that mature female sea lamprey prefer artificial nests activated with a mixture that reconstructs the male-released component ratio of 30:1 are shown. Expand
Isolation and Biological Activity of the Multi-Component Sea Lamprey Migratory Pheromone
TLDR
Cross-adaptation studies with EOG recording demonstrated that PADS, PSDS, and PS are detected by independent olfactory receptor sites and it is believed that these steroids are the principal components of the pheromone. Expand
Investigations of Novel Unsaturated Bile Salts of Male Sea Lamprey as Potential Chemical Cues
TLDR
This study reveals the structural diversity of bile salts in sea lamprey, some of which have been demonstrated to be pheromonal cues and attracted ovulated females to the point of application at a concentration of 10−12 M. Expand
Fatty-acid derivative acts as a sea lamprey migratory pheromone
TLDR
An olfactory mechanism whereby lampreys reliably identify and orient toward a proven spawning ground over a large spatial scale is illustrated and a potential strategy for sea lamprey control is implicate. Expand
Title Pheromonal bile acid 3-ketopetromyzonol sulfate primes the neuroendocrine system in sea lamprey Permalink
Background: Vertebrate pheromones are known to prime the endocrine system, especially the hypothalamicpituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. However, no known pheromone molecule has been shown to modulateExpand
Chemical cues and pheromones in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)
TLDR
It is suggested that the sea lamprey is a broadly useful organism with which to study vertebrate olfaction because of its simple but well-developed olfactory organ, the dominant role of olf action in guiding behaviors during reproduction, and the direct implications for vertebrate pest management. Expand
A critical review of the discovery and application of a migratory pheromone in an invasive fish, the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus L.
TLDR
After a long and difficult search, the most active components of a migratory pheromone for the sea lamprey were identified and synthesized and have revealed significant scientific and policy challenges. Expand
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Although PS was measured at picomolar concentrations in streams known to contain larval lampreys and attract migratory adults, ACA was not, and neither compound was measured in streams lacking larvae, which indicates that PS is a component of the natural pheromone, and it suggests that ACA has little relevance. Expand
Evidence That Petromyzontid Lampreys Employ a Common Migratory Pheromone That Is Partially Comprised of Bile Acids
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Results demonstrate that PS and ACA are commonly produced and released by larval petromyzontid lampreys and likely used as part of a common evolutionarily conserved pheromone. Expand
Larval sea lamprey release two unique bile acids** to the water at a rate sufficient to produce detectable riverine pheromone plumes
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Test whether lamprey release these bile acids to the water in quantities sufficient for them to function as a long distance attractant demonstrates for the first time in a fish that bile acid release rates and modes are adequate for these compounds to have pheromonal function. Expand
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Biochemical studies combined with electrophysiological recording from the sea lamprey olfactory system and behavioral experiments demonstrate that the migratory pheromone released by larvae is a potent stimulant of adult sea lampreys migratory behavior which might be useful inSea lamprey control. Expand
Direct behavioral evidence that unique bile acids released by larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) function as a migratory pheromone
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Four behavioral experiments provide evidence that adult sea lamprey select spawning rivers based on the odor of larvae that they contain and that bile acids released by the larvae are part of this pheromonal odor. Expand
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We show that reproductively mature male sea lampreys release a bile acid that acts as a potent sex pheromone, inducing preference and searching behavior in ovulated female lampreys. The secreted bileExpand
Pheromone Communication in Sea Lampreys (Petromyzon marinus): Implications for Population Management
The results of recent preference tests indicate that both male and female landlocked sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus), after reaching a specific stage of sexual maturation, release pheromones whichExpand
The olfactory system of migratory adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) is specifically and acutely sensitive to unique bile acids released by conspecific larvae
TLDR
The unique lamprey bile acids, ACA and PS, are potent and specific stimulants of the adult olfactory system, strongly supporting the hypothesis that these unique bile acid function as migratory pheromones in lamprey. Expand
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Electro-olfactogram recording data demonstrate that conspecific bile acids are discriminated by the olfactory epithelium of the sea lamprey, supporting the possibility that these compounds may function as migratory pheromones. Expand
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