Mixed reproductive strategy and mate guarding in a semi-colonial passerine, the swallow Hirundo rustica

@article{Mller2004MixedRS,
  title={Mixed reproductive strategy and mate guarding in a semi-colonial passerine, the swallow Hirundo rustica},
  author={Anders Pape M{\o}ller},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={17},
  pages={401-408}
}
  • A. Møller
  • Published 1 October 1985
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
SummaryBoth male and female swallows Hirundo rustica have a mixed reproductive strategy (parental care for offspring and extra-pair couplations). Mate guarding protects females from male harassment and male swallows from being cuckolded. Females hide their fertile period by copulating successfully with their mates for an extended period during first clutches. Males guard in the pre-fertile period, when many unpaired males are present. Early breeding swallows guard more than late breeders since… 
Mate guarding in the swallowHirundo rustica
  • A. Møller
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
TLDR
Male mates responded by increasing their mate guarding intensity as compared to controls, and neighbouring males showed an increased sexual interest in these females, which resulted in reduced nest attendance by females.
Mate guarding in the swallowHirundo rustica
  • A. Møller
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
TLDR
Male mates responded by increasing their mate guarding intensity as compared to controls, and neighbouring males showed an increased sexual interest in these females, which resulted in reduced nest attendance by females.
Trade-off between mate guarding and mate attraction in the polygynous great reed warbler
TLDR
The number of days that males sang long song during the primary female's fertile period was negatively correlated with the time of the season and this trend held also for individual males when comparing mating periods of their primary and secondary female.
Extra-pair copulations in a lek: the secondary mating system of monogamous razorbills
  • R. Wagner
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
TLDR
Findings in a monogamous species illustrate that EPC is a secondary mating system of razorbills in which sexual selection operates, and raises the possibility that lekking for EPCs may also occur within the nesting territories of other monogamous, colonial species but is “hidden” by competition for nests and breeding partners.
Mate Switching in a Non‐monogamous Species? The Case of the Common Quail (Coturnix coturnix)
TLDR
The constant inflow of new males observed throughout the fertile period of the female and the low costs stemming from mate change strongly support the idea that it is paired females who induce mate switching, in order to improve their fitness by mating with the best quality male available at every moment of their fertile period.
Mate-guarding, territorial intrusions and paternity defence in the polygynous Corn Bunting Miliaria calandra
TLDR
It is suggested that either the high detectability of intrusions in an open habitat or female control over access to fertilizations made close mate-guarding unnecessary and males may benefit more from maintaining their own territory in the hope of one or more females settling to breed, rather than seeking extra-pair copulations.
Male defense of the breeding cavity and factors affecting the persistence of breeding pairs in the stomatopod, Gonodactylus bredini (Manning) (Crustacea: Hoplocarida)
TLDR
Paired males were more successful at cavity defense than unpaired males, evidently because paired males strike intruders more than unpair males, and because intruders fight less intensely against paired males than against unpaired Males.
Male reproductive strategies and parental investment in the wheatear, Oenanthe oenanthe
TLDR
Female behaviour appeared to be the determining factor affecting the level of extra-pair paternity, although male guarding behaviours may have limited the opportunities for females to participate in extra- Pair copulations by deterring intrusions.
Mate guarding and frequent in-pair copulation in humans
TLDR
Men’s mate guarding and IPC frequency are correlated positively, and this association is not attributable to male age, female age, relationship satisfaction, relationship length, or time that the couple spends together.
Mate-Guarding in the Great Tit: Tactics of a Territorial Forest-Living Species
In the Great Tit Parus major distance between pair members decreased significantly during the fertile period of the female; at the same time a more clumped pattern of home range use was observed.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 33 REFERENCES
Requirements for a Mixed Reproductive Strategy in Avian Species
TLDR
Male herring gulls were able to leave mates alone because of confidence of paternity provided by the female in exchange for parental effort in the form of courtship feeding, the inferred consequence of successful EPC.
Extra-pair courtship in black-billed magpies
Extramarital and Pair Copulations in the Cattle Egret
TLDR
The behavior accompanying both pair copulations and ECs is described, quantitative data on the temporal variation in the frequency of ECs are analyzed, and underlying causal factors are considered.
Mate guarding in the magpie Pica pica
Nesting Ecology of the Little Blue Heron: Promiscuous Behavior
TLDR
Overall, extramarital copulations occurred relatively infrequently, owing to: (1) the nest-guarding behavior of the pair male, and (2) the uncooperativebehavior of the female.
Timing and duration of mate guarding in magpies, Pica pica
Experiments on Cuckoldry in the Mountain Bluebird
TLDR
It is concluded that mate attacks are only misplaced aggression, and it would not be adaptive for a male to drive away his mate, as asserted by Barash (1976-1978), unless he had very little certainty of paternity.
Sexual Differences in Parental Activities of Breeding Black Skimmers
In monogamous birds, breeding territories can be defended by either or both sexes, some or all of the time. The allocation (relative and absolute) of time and energy by either sex to territorial
Sociobiology of Bank Swallows: Reproductive Strategy of the Male
TLDR
Male bank swallows pursue a mixed reproductive strategy, and routinely seek promiscuous copulations with other females, both before and after pair-bonding.
...
...