Mixed‐agonist action of excitatory amino acids on mouse spinal cord neurones under voltage clamp.

@article{Mayer1984MixedagonistAO,
  title={Mixed‐agonist action of excitatory amino acids on mouse spinal cord neurones under voltage clamp.},
  author={Mark L Mayer and Gary L. Westbrook},
  journal={The Journal of Physiology},
  year={1984},
  volume={354}
}
Neurones from the ventral half of mouse embryo spinal cord were grown in tissue culture and voltage clamped with two micro‐electrodes. The current‐voltage relation of responses evoked by brief pressure applications of excitatory amino acids was examined over a membrane potential range of ‐100 to +70 mV. Three types of current‐voltage relation were observed. Responses to kainic and quisqualic acids were relatively linear within +/‐ 20 mV of the resting potential. N‐methyl‐D‐aspartate (NMDA) and… 
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It is concluded that both glutamate responses and excitatory synaptic transmission in lamprey Müller neurons are mediated by non-NMDA-type receptors and that these receptors are associated with ionic channels with a low elementary conductance.
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