Mitochondrial quality control, promoted by PGC-1α, is dysregulated by Western diet-induced obesity and partially restored by moderate physical activity in mice

@inproceedings{Greene2015MitochondrialQC,
  title={Mitochondrial quality control, promoted by PGC-1α, is dysregulated by Western diet-induced obesity and partially restored by moderate physical activity in mice},
  author={Nicholas P. Greene and David E. Lee and Jacob L. Brown and Megan E Rosa and Lemuel A. Brown and Richard A. Perry and Jordyn N Henry and Tyrone A. Washington},
  booktitle={Physiological reports},
  year={2015}
}
Skeletal muscle mitochondrial degeneration is a hallmark of insulin resistance/obesity marked by lost function, enhanced ROS emission, and altered morphology which may be ameliorated by physical activity (PA). However, no prior report has examined mitochondrial quality control regulation throughout biogenesis, fusion/fission dynamics, autophagy, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in obesity. Therefore, we determined how each process is impacted by Western diet (WD)-induced… CONTINUE READING

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