Mitochondrial Genome Assemblies of Elysia timida and Elysia cornigera and the Response of Mitochondrion-Associated Metabolism during Starvation

@article{Rauch2017MitochondrialGA,
  title={Mitochondrial Genome Assemblies of Elysia timida and Elysia cornigera and the Response of Mitochondrion-Associated Metabolism during Starvation},
  author={Cessa Rauch and G. Christa and Jan de Vries and Christian Woehle and S. Gould},
  journal={Genome Biology and Evolution},
  year={2017},
  volume={9},
  pages={1873 - 1879}
}
  • Cessa Rauch, G. Christa, +2 authors S. Gould
  • Published 2017
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Genome Biology and Evolution
  • Abstract Some sacoglossan sea slugs sequester functional plastids (kleptoplasts) from their food, which continue to fix CO2 in a light dependent manner inside the animals. In plants and algae, plastid and mitochondrial metabolism are linked in ways that reach beyond the provision of energy-rich carbon compounds through photosynthesis, but how slug mitochondria respond to starvation or alterations in plastid biochemistry has not been explored. We assembled the mitochondrial genomes of the… CONTINUE READING
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