Mitochondrial DNA studies of Native Americans: Conceptions and misconceptions of the population prehistory of the Americas

@article{Eshleman2003MitochondrialDS,
  title={Mitochondrial DNA studies of Native Americans: Conceptions and misconceptions of the population prehistory of the Americas},
  author={Jason A Eshleman and Ripan Singh Malhi and David George Smith},
  journal={Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues},
  year={2003},
  volume={12}
}
A decade ago, the first reviews of the collective mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) data from Native Americans concluded that the Americas were peopled through multiple migrations from different Asian populations beginning more than 30,000 years ago. 1 These reports confirmed multiple‐wave hypotheses suggested earlier by other sources and rejected the dominant Clovis‐first archeological paradigm. Consequently, it appeared that molecular biology had made a significant contribution to the study of… Expand
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