Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism, phylogeography, and conservation genetics of the brown bear Ursus arctos in Europe

@article{Taberlet1994MitochondrialDP,
  title={Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism, phylogeography, and conservation genetics of the brown bear Ursus arctos in Europe},
  author={Pierre Taberlet and J. -M. Bouvet},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1994},
  volume={255},
  pages={195 - 200}
}
  • P. Taberlet, J. Bouvet
  • Published 22 March 1994
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
Some small European populations of the brown bear (Ursus arctos) are threatened by the risk of extinction in the near future. The reinforcement of these populations with bears from other regions might provide a solution to their future survival. However, before any population transfer, the different conservation units must be identified. The phylogeographic approach has been advocated for this purpose. The different European populations were assayed for mitochondrial (mt) DNA polymorphism. A… 

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