Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of red deer (Cervus elaphus).

@article{Ludt2004MitochondrialDP,
  title={Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of red deer (Cervus elaphus).},
  author={Christian Ludt and Wolf Schroeder and Oswald Rottmann and Ralph Kuehn},
  journal={Molecular phylogenetics and evolution},
  year={2004},
  volume={31 3},
  pages={
          1064-83
        }
}
Phylogeography of red deer (Cervus elaphus): Analysis of MtDNA cytochrome b polymorphism
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Overall, the reconstructed phylogeographic pattern of the species was significantly different from the subspecies differentiation based on morphological traits.
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The findings reveal a paraphyletic nature for Iberian red deer but also its genetic identity and differentiation with respect to northern subspecies, and it is suggested that maintaining the singularity of Iberia requires preventing not only restocking practices with red deer specimens belonging to other European populations but also translocations between both Iberians.
The genus Cervus in eastern Eurasia
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    European Journal of Wildlife Research
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The two species groups in this region that seem to crystallize both the problems of cervine classification and the ways in which the new sources of evidence have opened up new avenues of inquiry are considered.
Phylogeography of the Tyrrhenian red deer (Cervus elaphus corsicanus) resolved using ancient DNA of radiocarbon-dated subfossils
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Together with palaeontological evidence, genetic results identify the Italian Peninsula as the ultimate origin of the B lineage and thus the Tyrrhenian and North African red deer.
Integrating phylogeographic patterns of microsatellite and mtDNA divergence to infer the evolutionary history of chamois (genus Rupicapra)
TLDR
The phylogeographic patterns for mtDNA and microsatellites suggest an evolutionary history with limited range contractions and expansions during the Quaternary period and reflect a major effect of the Alpine barrier on west-east differentiation.
Positioning the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) Hunted by the Tyrolean Iceman into a Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeny
TLDR
The phylogenetic analyses showed that the haplotype of the Alpine Copper Age red deer falls within the western European mitochondrial lineage in contrast with the current populations from the Italian Alps belonging to the eastern lineage.
Genetic diversity and phylogeography of European Roe Deer, Capreolus capreolus, in Iran as inferred from mtDNA genes (Mammalia: Cervidae)
TLDR
It seems this species probably entered Iran from Europe through northern Iran, and then spread to the western/northwestern regions of the country over time.
Mitochondrial D-loop phylogeny signals two native Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus) Lineages genetically different to Western and Eastern European red deer and infers human-mediated translocations
TLDR
The extant phylogenetic relationship and evidences of genetic admixture suggest that sound conservation actions for the native Iberian red deer should severely restrict the introduction of alien red deer and, when possible, avoid admixture between the South-Western and Central-Eastern mtDNA lineages.
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A comparison of sequences from the control region of mitochondrial DNA from North American and Siberian wapiti, European red deer, and Asian sika deer was used to construct a phylogenetic relationship among these cervids and other cervids found within North America, suggesting that the subspecies status of North American wapitis needs to be reviewed.
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