Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography and population history of the grey wolf Canis lupus

@article{Vil1999MitochondrialDP,
  title={Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography and population history of the grey wolf Canis lupus},
  author={Carles Vil{\`a} and Isabel R. Amorim and Jennifer A. Leonard and David Posada and Javier Castroviejo and Francisco Petrucci-Fonseca and Keith A. Crandall and Hans Ellegren and Robert K. Wayne},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={1999},
  volume={8}
}
The grey wolf (Canis lupus) and coyote (C. latrans) are highly mobile carnivores that disperse over great distances in search of territories and mates. Previous genetic studies have shown little geographical structure in either species. However, population genetic structure is also influenced by past isolation events and population fluctuations during glacial periods. In this study, control region sequence data from a worldwide sample of grey wolves and a more limited sample of coyotes were… 
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