Mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome diversity and the peopling of the Americas: Evolutionary and demographic evidence

@article{Schurr2004MitochondrialDA,
  title={Mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome diversity and the peopling of the Americas: Evolutionary and demographic evidence},
  author={Theodore G. Schurr and Stephen T. Sherry},
  journal={American Journal of Human Biology},
  year={2004},
  volume={16}
}
  • T. Schurr, S. Sherry
  • Published 1 July 2004
  • Geography, Medicine
  • American Journal of Human Biology
A number of important insights into the peopling of the New World have been gained through molecular genetic studies of Siberian and Native American populations. While there is no complete agreement on the interpretation of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosome (NRY) data from these groups, several generalizations can be made. To begin with, the primary migration of ancestral Asians expanded from south‐central Siberia into the New World and gave rise to ancestral Amerindians. The… 
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