Mite‐related bacterial antigens stimulate inflammatory cells in rosacea

@article{Lacey2007MiterelatedBA,
  title={Mite‐related bacterial antigens stimulate inflammatory cells in rosacea},
  author={N Lacey and Shane Delaney and Kevin Kavanagh and Frank C. Powell},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2007},
  volume={157}
}
Background Patients with papulopustular rosacea have a higher density of Demodex folliculorum mites on their faces than normal subjects but the role, if any, of their mites in initiating inflammation is disputed. Selective antibiotics are effective in reducing the inflammatory changes of papulopustular rosacea, but their mode of action is unknown. 
Demodex‐associated bacterial proteins induce neutrophil activation
TLDR
A bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite from a patient with papulopustular rosacea was previously shown to provoke an immune response in patients with PPR, thus suggesting a possible role for bacterial proteins in the aetiology of this condition. Expand
Demodex-associated bacterial proteins induce neutrophil
TLDR
To examine the response of neutrophils to proteins derived from a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite, a large number of patients with rosacea and controls were diagnosed with the condition. Expand
Demodex mites modulate sebocyte immune reaction: possible role in the pathogenesis of rosacea
TLDR
The Demodex mite population in the skin of rosacea patients is significantly higher than in patients with normal skin, suggesting that they may be of aetiological importance in this disorder. Expand
Rosacea and Demodex folliculorum
TLDR
Potential pathogenic mechanisms by which Demodex mites may contribute to the development of inflammatory lesions in papulopustular rosacea (PPR) are proposed. Expand
Positive correlation between serum immunoreactivity to Demodex‐associated Bacillus proteins and erythematotelangiectatic rosacea
TLDR
A bacterium isolated from Demodex mites from a patient with papulopustular rosacea has been demonstrated to produce antigenic proteins that may play a role in papulipustular and ocular ro sacea. Expand
Papulopustular rosacea, skin immunity and Demodex: pityriasis folliculorum as a missing link
  • F. Forton
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV
  • 2012
TLDR
Papulopustular rosacea is a common facial skin disease, characterized by erythema, telangiectasia, papules and pustules, and several molecular features of its inflammatory process have been identified: an overproduction of Toll‐Like receptors 2, of a serine protease, and of abnormal forms of cathelicidin. Expand
The potential role of microorganisms in the development of rosacea
TLDR
Currently available scientific data on the potential pathogenetic role of microorganisms in the development of rosacea are reviewed. Expand
Microbiota in Rosacea
  • Hei Sung Kim
  • Medicine
  • American Journal of Clinical Dermatology
  • 2020
TLDR
The potential pathogenic role of microbes in the development of rosacea is reviewed and methods to analyze complex microbial communities at the taxonomic and phylogenetic levels became available. Expand
Demodex and rosacea revisited.
TLDR
The emergence of ivermectin as a key therapy for rosacea has refocused interest in the role of Demodex mites in the pathogenesis of this skin disease and the ability of DemODex to modulate the host immune system. Expand
Demodex mites in acne rosacea: reflectance confocal microscopic study
TLDR
reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has been shown to be a good method for determining demodex mite density in acne rosacea patients and compare them with controls. Expand
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TLDR
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