Missionaries and Indigenous Education in the 19th‐Century British Empire. Part I: Church‐State Relations and Indigenous Actions and Reactions

@article{Jensz2012MissionariesAI,
  title={Missionaries and Indigenous Education in the 19th‐Century British Empire. Part I: Church‐State Relations and Indigenous Actions and Reactions},
  author={Felicity Jensz},
  journal={History Compass},
  year={2012},
  volume={10},
  pages={294-305}
}
  • F. Jensz
  • Published 1 April 2012
  • Psychology
  • History Compass
Missionaries were major providers of education in the colonial world, and in many cases were the initial and exclusive agents of education for Indigenous and non-European people, whom they hoped could be converted to Christianity through religious schooling. However, by the end of the 19th century many governments in colonial lands were keen to take more active roles in providing secular education for their subjects, which, in turn, engendered tensions between missionary groups, governments… Expand
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