Missense mutation in flavin-containing mono-oxygenase 3 gene, FMO3, underlies fish-odour syndrome

@article{Dolphin1997MissenseMI,
  title={Missense mutation in flavin-containing mono-oxygenase 3 gene, FMO3, underlies fish-odour syndrome},
  author={Colin T. Dolphin and Azara Janmohamed and Robert L. Smith and Elizabeth A Shephard and L R Phillips},
  journal={Nature Genetics},
  year={1997},
  volume={17},
  pages={491-494}
}
Individuals with primary trimethylaminuria exhibit a body odour reminiscent of rotting fish, due to excessive excretion of trimethylamine (TMA; refs 1–3). The disorder, colloquially known as fish-odour syndrome, is inherited recessively as a defect in hepatic N-oxidation of dietary-derived TMA4–6 and cannot be considered benign, as sufferers may display a variety of psychosocial reactions, ranging from social isolation to clinical depression and attempted suicide6. TMA oxidation is catalyzed by… CONTINUE READING
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