Misinformation Effects in Recall: Creating False Memories through Repeated Retrieval

@article{Roediger1996MisinformationEI,
  title={Misinformation Effects in Recall: Creating False Memories through Repeated Retrieval},
  author={Henry L Roediger and Derek Jacoby and Kathleen B. McDermott},
  journal={Journal of Memory and Language},
  year={1996},
  volume={35},
  pages={300-318}
}
Abstract In two experiments subjects viewed slides depicting a crime and then received a narrative containing misleading information about some items in the slides. Recall instructions were manipulated on a first test to vary the probability that subjects would produce details from the narrative that conflicted with details from the slides. Two days later subjects returned and took a second cued recall test on which they were instructed to respond only if they were sure they had seen the item… Expand

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