Misidentification of copperhead and cottonmouth snakes following snakebites*

@article{Cox2018MisidentificationOC,
  title={Misidentification of copperhead and cottonmouth snakes following snakebites*},
  author={Robert D. Cox and Christina Parker and Erin E Cox and Michael B Marlin and Robert L. Galli},
  journal={Clinical Toxicology},
  year={2018},
  volume={56},
  pages={1195 - 1199}
}
Abstract Introduction: Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and cottonmouth or water moccasin (Agkistrodon piscivorus) snakes account for the majority of venomous snakebites in the southern United States. Cottonmouth snakes are generally considered to have more potent venom. Copperheads are considered less venomous and there is some controversy as to whether or not bites from copperhead snakes need to be treated with antivenom. Copperhead and juvenile cottonmouth snakes are both brown in color… 
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