Mirror-sensory synaesthesia: Exploring ‘shared’ sensory experiences as synaesthesia

@article{Fitzgibbon2012MirrorsensorySE,
  title={Mirror-sensory synaesthesia: Exploring ‘shared’ sensory experiences as synaesthesia},
  author={Bernadette M. Fitzgibbon and Peter G. Enticott and Anina N. Rich and Melita J. Giummarra and Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis and John L. Bradshaw},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2012},
  volume={36},
  pages={645-657}
}
Recent research suggests the observation or imagination of somatosensory stimulation in another (e.g., touch or pain) can induce a similar somatosensory experience in oneself. Some researchers have presented this experience as a type of synaesthesia, whereas others consider it an extreme experience of an otherwise normal perception. Here, we present an argument that these descriptions are not mutually exclusive. They may describe the extreme version of the normal process of understanding… Expand

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