Mirror Therapy Promotes Recovery From Severe Hemiparesis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

@article{Dohle2009MirrorTP,
  title={Mirror Therapy Promotes Recovery From Severe Hemiparesis: A Randomized Controlled Trial},
  author={Christian Dohle and Judith P{\"u}llen and Antje Nakaten and Jutta K{\"u}st and Christian Rietz and Hans Karbe},
  journal={Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair},
  year={2009},
  volume={23},
  pages={209 - 217}
}
Background. Rehabilitation of the severely affected paretic arm after stroke represents a major challenge, especially in the presence of sensory impairment. Objective. To evaluate the effect of a therapy that includes use of a mirror to simulate the affected upper extremity with the unaffected upper extremity early after stroke. Methods. Thirty-six patients with severe hemiparesis because of a first-ever ischemic stroke in the territory of the middle cerebral artery were enrolled, no more than… Expand
Mirror therapy enhances upper extremity motor recovery in stroke patients
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy program in addition with physical therapy methods on upper limb recovery in patients with subacute ischemic stroke. 15 subjectsExpand
Mirror therapy enhances motor performance in the paretic upper limb after stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Randomized Controlled Trial Motor Recovery and Cortical Reorganization After Mirror Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients : A Phase II
Objective. To evaluate for any clinical effects of home-based mirror therapy and subsequent cortical reorganization in patients with chronic stroke with moderate upper extremity paresis. Methods. AExpand
Effects of mirror therapy on motor and sensory recovery in chronic stroke: a randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
The application of mirror therapy after stroke might result in beneficial effects on movement performance, motor control, and temperature sense, but may not translate into daily functions in the population with chronic stroke. Expand
The Effect of Mirror Therapy Compared to Sham Therapy in Hand Motor Recovery in Sub-acute Stroke
Objective: To evaluate the effect of mirror therapy on motor recovery of stroke patients. Methods: stroke, that were divided into two groups: mirror and sham. They completed a protocol of six weeksExpand
The Mirror Therapy Program Enhances Upper-Limb Motor Recovery and Motor Function in Acute Stroke Patients
TLDR
It is confirmed that mirror therapy program is an effective intervention for upper-limb motor recovery and motor function improvement in acute stroke patients and should be used as a standardized form of hand rehabilitation in clinics and homes. Expand
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