Mirror Neurons and the Evolution of Embodied Language

@article{Fogassi2007MirrorNA,
  title={Mirror Neurons and the Evolution of Embodied Language},
  author={Leonardo Fogassi and Pier Francesco Ferrari},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={2007},
  volume={16},
  pages={136 - 141}
}
  • L. Fogassi, P. Ferrari
  • Published 1 June 2007
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Current Directions in Psychological Science
Mirror neurons are a class of neurons first discovered in the monkey premotor cortex that activate both when the monkey executes an action and when it observes the same action made by another individual. These neurons enable individuals to understand actions performed by others. Two subcategories of mirror neurons in monkeys activate when they listen to action sounds and when they observe communicative gestures made by others, respectively. The properties of mirror neurons could constitute a… 

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