Mirror-Induced Behavior in the Magpie (Pica pica): Evidence of Self-Recognition

@article{Prior2008MirrorInducedBI,
  title={Mirror-Induced Behavior in the Magpie (Pica pica): Evidence of Self-Recognition},
  author={Helmut Prior and Ariane Schwarz and Onur G{\"u}nt{\"u}rk{\"u}n},
  journal={PLoS Biology},
  year={2008},
  volume={6}
}
Comparative studies suggest that at least some bird species have evolved mental skills similar to those found in humans and apes. This is indicated by feats such as tool use, episodic-like memory, and the ability to use one's own experience in predicting the behavior of conspecifics. It is, however, not yet clear whether these skills are accompanied by an understanding of the self. In apes, self-directed behavior in response to a mirror has been taken as evidence of self-recognition. We… 

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