Minimum alcohol prices and outlet densities in British Columbia, Canada: estimated impacts on alcohol-attributable hospital admissions.

@article{Stockwell2013MinimumAP,
  title={Minimum alcohol prices and outlet densities in British Columbia, Canada: estimated impacts on alcohol-attributable hospital admissions.},
  author={Tim R Stockwell and Jinhui Zhao and Gina Martin and Scott Macdonald and Kate Vallance and Andrew J. Treno and William R. Ponicki and Andrew W. Tu and Jane A. Buxton},
  journal={American journal of public health},
  year={2013},
  volume={103 11},
  pages={
          2014-20
        }
}
OBJECTIVES We investigated whether periodic increases in minimum alcohol prices were associated with reduced alcohol-attributable hospital admissions in British Columbia. METHODS The longitudinal panel study (2002-2009) incorporated minimum alcohol prices, density of alcohol outlets, and age- and gender-standardized rates of acute, chronic, and 100% alcohol-attributable admissions. We applied mixed-method regression models to data from 89 geographic areas of British Columbia across 32 time… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

The impacts of minimum alcohol pricing on alcohol attributable morbidity in regions of British Colombia, Canada with low, medium and high mean family income
TLDR
In Canada, minimum price increases for alcohol are associated with reductions in alcohol attributable hospitalizations, especially for populations with lower income, both for immediate effects on acute hospitalizations and delayed effects on chronic hospitalizations.
Alcohol outlet density and alcohol related hospital admissions in England: a national small‐area level ecological study
TLDR
In England, higher densities of several categories of alcohol outlets appear to be associated with higher hospital admission rates for conditions wholly attributable to alcohol consumption.
Relationships Between Minimum Alcohol Pricing and Crime During the Partial Privatization of a Canadian Government Alcohol Monopoly.
TLDR
Reductions in crime events associated with minimum-alcohol-price changes were more substantial and specific to alcohol-related events than the countervailing increases in densities of private liquor stores, lending further support to the application of minimum alcohol prices for public health and safety objectives.
How many alcohol-attributable deaths and hospital admissions could be prevented by alternative pricing and taxation policies? Modelling impacts on alcohol consumption, revenues and related harms in Canada.
TLDR
Improved public health outcomes would be made possible by increasing alcohol excise tax rates across all beverages to compensate for past failures to index rates, and setting a MUP of at least $1.75 per standard drink.
Minimum Prices for Alcohol and Educational Disparities in Alcohol-related Mortality
Background: Minimum price of alcohol is one of the proposed set of alcohol policies in many high-income countries. However, the extent to which alcohol-related harm is associated with minimum prices
Trends in alcohol-related admissions to hospital by age, sex and socioeconomic deprivation in England, 2002/03 to 2013/14
TLDR
There have been increasing hospital admissions attributable to alcohol between 2002/03 and 2013/14, particularly concentrated in middle aged males and deprived areas, but the increase in young females being admitted for ‘Intentional self-poisoning due to alcohol’ raises additional concerns.
Investigation of the Association Between Alcohol Outlet Density and Alcohol-Related Hospital Admission Rates in England: Study Protocol
TLDR
The aim of this study is to investigate the association between alcohol outlet density and hospital admissions for alcohol-related conditions in a national (English) small area level ecological study and provide a national evidence base to inform policy decisions regarding the licensing of alcohol sales outlets.
Immediate impact of minimum unit pricing on alcohol purchases in Scotland: controlled interrupted time series analysis for 2015-18
TLDR
The introduction of minimum unit pricing appears to have been successful in reducing the amount of alcohol purchased by households in Scotland, and the action was targeted, in that reductions of purchased alcohol only occurred in the households that bought the most alcohol.
The early impact of Scotland's minimum unit pricing policy on alcohol prices and sales.
TLDR
The average price per unit of alcohol has significantly risen post-MUP across all beverage categories, whereas liters of alcohol sold per adult and per adult drinker have significantly reduced for beer, spirits, cider, and alcohol-all types.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 37 REFERENCES
Does minimum pricing reduce alcohol consumption? The experience of a Canadian province.
TLDR
Impact of minimum alcohol prices in British Columbia on alcohol consumption is estimated using time-series and longitudinal models of aggregate alcohol consumption with price and other economic data as independent variables.
Alcohol outlet densities and alcohol price: the British Columbia experiment in the partial privatization of alcohol sales off-premise.
TLDR
Increased densities of private off- sale alcohol outlets appear to result in lower prices charged at said establishments independently of other types of alcohol outlets suggesting that they represent an emerging marketing niche in the context of off-sale outlet privatization.
The raising of minimum alcohol prices in Saskatchewan, Canada: impacts on consumption and implications for public health.
TLDR
Impacts on alcohol consumption following new and increased minimum alcohol prices in Saskatchewan, Canada show minimum pricing is a promising strategy for reducing the public health burden associated with hazardous alcohol consumption.
Changes in per capita alcohol sales during the partial privatization of British Columbia's retail alcohol monopoly 2003-2008: a multi-level local area analysis.
TLDR
The trend towards privatisation of liquor outlets between 2003/04 and 2007/08 in British Columbia has contributed to increased per capita sales of alcohol and hence possibly also to increased alcohol-related harm.
Impact on alcohol-related mortality of a rapid rise in the density of private liquor outlets in British Columbia: a local area multi-level analysis.
TLDR
The rapidly rising densities of private liquor stores in British Columbia from 2003 to 2008 was associated with a significant local-area increase in rates of alcohol-related death.
Distribution of alcohol consumption and expenditures and the impact of improved measurement on coverage of alcohol sales in the 2000 National Alcohol Survey.
TLDR
The distributions of mean alcohol intake and heavy drinking days are highly concentrated in the U.S. population, and lower expenditures per drink by the heaviest drinkers suggest substantial downward quality substitution, drinking in cheaper contexts or other bargain pricing strategies.
Effects of alcohol tax and price policies on morbidity and mortality: a systematic review.
TLDR
The results suggest that doubling the alcohol tax would reduce alcohol-related mortality by an average of 35%, traffic crash deaths by 11%, sexually transmitted disease by 6%, violence by 2%, and crime by 1.4%.
The impact of alcohol taxation on liver cirrhosis mortality.
TLDR
Cirrhosis rates were found to be significantly related to taxes on distilled spirits but not to taxation of wine and beer, and appears more closely linked to consumption of distilled spirits than to that of other alcoholic beverages.
The impact of the Northern Territory's Living With Alcohol program, 1992-2002: revisiting the evaluation.
TLDR
The combined impact of the LWA program Levy and the programs and services funded by the Levy reduced the burden of alcohol-attributable injury to the NT in the short term and may have contributed to a reduction in chronic illness in the longer term.
...
...