Minimization of Childhood Maltreatment Is Common and Consequential: Results from a Large, Multinational Sample Using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire

@inproceedings{Macdonald2016MinimizationOC,
  title={Minimization of Childhood Maltreatment Is Common and Consequential: Results from a Large, Multinational Sample Using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire},
  author={Kai Macdonald and Mike Thomas and Andres Felipe Sciolla and Beacher Schneider and Katherine Pappas and Gijs G Bleijenberg and Martin Bohus and Bradley Bekh and L. Carpenter and Alan Carr and Udo Dannlowski and Martin J. Dorahy and Claudia Fahlke and Ricky Finzi-Dottan and Tobi Karu and Arne Gerdner and Heide Glaesmer and Hans J{\"o}rgen Grabe and Marianne Heins and Dianna T. Kenny and Daeho Kim and Hans Knoop and Jill Lobbestael and Christine Lochner and Grethe Lauritzen and Edle Ravndal and Shelley A. Riggs and Vedat Şar and Ingo Sch{\"a}fer and Nicole Schlosser and Melanie L. Schwandt and Murray B. Stein and Claudia Subic-Wrana and Mark E. Vogel and K Wingenfeld and James G. Scott},
  booktitle={PloS one},
  year={2016}
}
Childhood maltreatment has diverse, lifelong impact on morbidity and mortality. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) is one of the most commonly used scales to assess and quantify these experiences and their impact. Curiously, despite very widespread use of the CTQ, scores on its Minimization-Denial (MD) subscale-originally designed to assess a positive response bias-are rarely reported. Hence, little is known about this measure. If response biases are either common or consequential… CONTINUE READING