Minimally Invasive Cardiac Output Monitoring in the Perioperative Setting

@article{Funk2009MinimallyIC,
  title={Minimally Invasive Cardiac Output Monitoring in the Perioperative Setting},
  author={Duane J. Funk and Eugene W. Moretti and Tong J. Gan},
  journal={Anesthesia \& Analgesia},
  year={2009},
  volume={108},
  pages={887-897}
}
With advancing age and increased co-morbidities in patients, the need for monitoring devices during the perioperative period that allow clinicians to track physiologic variables, such as cardiac output (CO), fluid responsiveness and tissue perfusion, is increasing. Until recently, the only tool available to anesthesiologists to monitor CO was either a pulmonary artery catheter or transesophageal echocardiograph. These devices have their limitations and potential for morbidity. Several new… Expand
Cardiac Output Assessed by Invasive and Minimally Invasive Techniques
Cardiac output (CO) measurement has long been considered essential to the assessment and guidance of therapeutic decisions in critically ill patients and for patients undergoing certain high-riskExpand
Minimally invasive cardiac output monitors
TLDR
The principles behind the calculation of cardiac output and potential sources of error for devices used in clinical practice are reviewed and some of the clinical situations in which the accuracy of these monitors may be limited are reviewed. Expand
Minimally invasive or noninvasive cardiac output measurement: an update
TLDR
The developing focus in CO monitoring devices appears to be shifting to tissue perfusion and microcirculatory flow and aimed more at markers that indicate the effectiveness of circulatory and micro Circulatory resuscitations. Expand
Pulmonary carbon dioxide elimination for cardiac output monitoring in peri-operative and critical care patients: history and current status.
  • P. Peyton
  • Medicine
  • Journal of healthcare engineering
  • 2013
TLDR
The underlying principles and evolution of the Fick approach to cardiac output measurement are reviewed, and future directions including recent adaptations designed to deliver continuous breath-by-breath monitoring of cardiac output are reviewed. Expand
Most Care®: a minimally invasive system for hemodynamic monitoring powered by the Pressure Recording Analytical Method (PRAM)
TLDR
The present paper reviewed the current literature focusing on advantages and limitations of PRAM and found Most Care® is a minimally invasive arterial pressure based monitor powered by the Pressure Recording Analytical Method (PRAM), the only algorithm that does not require prior calibration or pre-calculated parameters and which is based of flow. Expand
Hemodynamic monitoring during liver transplantation: A state of the art review.
TLDR
Pulse wave analysis is a newer technology that uses computer algorithms to calculate CO, stroke volume variation (SVV) and pulse pressure variation (PPV), although SVV and PPV have been found to be accurate predicators of fluid responsiveness, CO measurements are not reliable during liver transplantation. Expand
Cardiac output monitoring in pediatric patients
TLDR
This article focuses on the currently available minimally invasive and noninvasive monitoring devices for CO measurement in children. Expand
Using arterial pressure waveform analysis for the assessment of fluid responsiveness
TLDR
Technical aspects of the assessment of the functional hemodynamic parameters derived from pulse waveform analysis are summarized, emphasizing their advantages, limitations and potential applications, primarily in a perioperative setting in order to improve patient outcome. Expand
The PiCCO Monitor
TLDR
An alternative approach to the PAC monitoring has been proposed—the functional hemodynamic monitoring, which focuses on the effects of positive pressure ventilation on left ventricular (LV) output;positive pressure ventilation induces phasic changes in LV stroke volume through similar cyclicChanges in venous return. Expand
Continuous minimally invasive peri-operative monitoring of cardiac output by pulmonary capnotracking: comparison with thermodilution and transesophageal echocardiography
  • P. Peyton
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
  • 2012
TLDR
The VCO2 elimination method is relatively seamless and largely automated and has potential for continuous, cardiac output monitoring in ventilated patients during anesthesia and critical care. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 83 REFERENCES
Esophageal Doppler ultrasound monitor versus pulmonary artery catheter in the hemodynamic management of critically ill surgical patients.
TLDR
Corrected flow time is a better indicator of preload than pulmonary capillary wedge pressures and EDM seems to be at least as useful as PA catheter in managing the hemodynamic status of critically ill surgical patients. Expand
Utility of esophageal Doppler as a minimally invasive hemodynamic monitor: a review
  • K. Laupland, C. Bands
  • Medicine
  • Canadian journal of anaesthesia = Journal canadien d'anesthesie
  • 2002
PurposeThe current bedside “gold standard” for cardiac output (CO) monitoring is thermodilution using a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) but there is a number of risks associated with its use. TheExpand
Minimally invasive hemodynamic monitoring for the intensivist: Current and emerging technology
TLDR
Emerging noninvasive or minimally invasive means of cardiac output monitoring are based on varied physiologic principles and can be used for following hemodynamic trends. Expand
Non-Invasive Cardiac Output Monitoring by Aortic Blood Flow Measurement With the Dynemo 3000
TLDR
The operating principles and methods for the continuous determination of aortic blood flow (ABF) with the Dynemo 3000 system are described in detail and a review of the clinical validation and comparison to thermo dilution measurements showing a significant positive correlation over a wide range of clinical flow situations is presented. Expand
Clinical evaluation of the FloTrac/Vigileo system and two established continuous cardiac output monitoring devices in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.
TLDR
The performance of the FloTrac/Vigileo system, the PiCCOplus, and the Vigilance CCO monitoring for CO measurement were comparable when tested against intermittent thermodilution in patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Expand
Continuous hemodynamic monitoring by esophageal Doppler.
TLDR
Seventy-eight changes in left ventricular filling, systemic vascular resistance, or inotropic state produced consistent alterations in waveform shape with a narrow-based waveform being indicative of hypovolemia. Expand
Bench to bedside: electrophysiologic and clinical principles of noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring using impedance cardiography.
TLDR
Impedance cardiography (ICG) is a noninvasive method of obtaining continuous measurements of hemodynamic data such as cardiac output that requires little technical expertise and is important for the possible role of this technology in the practice of emergency medicine. Expand
Intraoperative cardiac output monitoring: comparison of impedance cardiography and thermodilution.
TLDR
Impedance cardiography is a noninvasive, simple to use method of cardiac output (CO) determination that appears warranted if it is to prove useful as an intraoperative cardiac monitor. Expand
Continuous Noninvasive Monitoring of Cardiac Output with Esophageal Doppler Ultrasound during Cardiac Surgery
TLDR
The esophageal Doppler technique allows cardiac output monitoring in patients for whom invasive monitoring is not warranted and was more reproducible, showing less short-term variability than thermodilution cardiac output. Expand
Noninvasive monitoring of cardiac output in critically ill patients using transesophageal Doppler.
TLDR
It is confirmed that transesophageal Doppler can provide a noninvasive, clinically useful estimate of cardiac output and detect hemodynamic changes in mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...