Minds in Crisis: Medico-moral Theories of Disorder in the Late Colonial World

@inproceedings{Kennedy2016MindsIC,
  title={Minds in Crisis: Medico-moral Theories of Disorder in the Late Colonial World},
  author={Dane Kennedy},
  year={2016}
}
This chapter examines two now-discredited medical theories that offered similar diagnoses of mental and moral disorder in the late colonial world. One theory concerned the colonizers and the other the colonized. Tropical neurasthenia, a popular diagnosis in the early twentieth century, attributed mental breakdowns by Western residents of the colonial tropics to their difficulties coping with primitive environments. Ethnopsychiatry, which gained currency in the era of decolonization, attributed… Expand

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