Mind Reading: Neural Mechanisms of Theory of Mind and Self-Perspective

@article{Vogeley2001MindRN,
  title={Mind Reading: Neural Mechanisms of Theory of Mind and Self-Perspective},
  author={Kai Vogeley and Patrick Bussfeld and Albert Newen and S. Herrmann and Francesca Happ{\'e} and Peter G Falkai and Wolfgang Maier and Nadim Joni Shah and Gereon Rudolf Fink and Karl Zilles},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2001},
  volume={14},
  pages={170-181}
}
Human self-consciousness as the metarepresentation of ones own mental states and the so-called theory of mind (TOM) capacity, which requires the ability to model the mental states of others, are closely related higher cognitive functions. We address here the issue of whether taking the self-perspective (SELF) or modeling the mind of someone else (TOM) employ the same or differential neural mechanisms. A TOM paradigm was used and extended to include stimulus material that involved TOM and SELF… Expand
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