Mind, brain, and personality disorders.

@article{Gabbard2005MindBA,
  title={Mind, brain, and personality disorders.},
  author={G. Gabbard},
  journal={The American journal of psychiatry},
  year={2005},
  volume={162 4},
  pages={
          648-55
        }
}
  • G. Gabbard
  • Published 2005
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The American journal of psychiatry
OBJECTIVE The use of the terms "mind" and "brain" in psychiatry is often associated with a set of polarities. Concepts such as environment, psychosocial, and psychotherapy are linked with "mind," while genes, biology, and medication are often associated with "brain." The author examines these dichotomies as they apply to personality disorders. METHOD Research on antisocial and borderline personality disorders that is relevant to these dichotomies is evaluated. The implications of the findings… Expand
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