Mimivirus and the emerging concept of "giant" virus.

@article{Claverie2006MimivirusAT,
  title={Mimivirus and the emerging concept of "giant" virus.},
  author={Jean-Michel Claverie and Hiroyuki Ogata and St{\'e}phane Audic and Chantal Abergel and Karsten Suhre and Pierre-Edouard Fournier},
  journal={Virus research},
  year={2006},
  volume={117 1},
  pages={
          133-44
        }
}

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